Black History Month: Yvonne Walker: Celebrating hard-earned rights

Voting gives us a voice. It gives us a seat at the table. It’s the great equalizer to money and power, and has been a central pillar to our democracy since the inception of the United States. But due to centuries of institutional and socialized racism in America, African Americans did not have the right […]

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Unions an Integral Part of Dr. King’s Dream

“In the days to come, organized labor will increase its importance in the destinies of Negroes. Automation is imperceptibly but inexorably producing dislocations, skimming off unskilled labor from the industrial force. The displaced are flowing into proliferating service occupations. These enterprises are traditionally unorganized and provide low wage scales with longer hours. The Negroes pressed […]

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Honoring Labor and Civil Rights: Activist C.L. Dellums

Cottrell Laurence Dellums, also known as C.L. Dellums, was a prominent African American trade union activist, and uncle and role model to  Congressman Ron Dellums. C.L Dellums was born in Corsicana, Texas on January 3, 1900. He moved to the San Francisco Bay Area when he was a young man to escape racial and economic […]

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Martin Luther King Jr., union man

If Martin Luther King Jr. still lived, he’d probably tell people to join unions. King understood racial equality was inextricably linked to economics. He asked, “What good does it do to be able to eat at a lunch counter if you can’t buy a hamburger?” Those disadvantages have persisted. Today, for instance, the wealth of […]

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Reverend Addie L. Wyatt: A Champion of Labor and Civil Rights

In celebration of Black History Month, we honor the black unionists who have been monumental figures in progressing workers’ rights. While not a household name, the Reverend Addie L. Wyatt had a major impact on both the labor movement and civil rights movement… Born in 1924 in Brookhaven, Mississippi, Wyatt grew up during a time in […]

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Twenty-Nine Days to Celebrate Black History Isn’t Enough

Black History Month is meant to celebrate the achievements of African Americans in the United States. While we have made huge strides toward overcoming the barriers that have set us back—we have not fully overcome the damages that centuries of exploitation, oppression and free labor have had on our communities due to enslavement and Jim Crow laws. Many people tell our community that we should “get over it” and “slavery is over, the playing field is equal”—but it’s no secret that structural racism has continued to plague our community with higher unemployment rates, over incarceration and a wider education gap than whites and other communities of color.

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